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Full text of "NAEB Washington Report (November 1964)"

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APPLICATIONS BEING TAKEN FOR ADDITIONAL PERSONNEL FOR SAMOAN ETV PROJECT 

It is expected that the second and third phases of the educational and instr¬ 
uctional television project in American Samoa will get underway early in the new year. 

The NAEB is now accepting applications for positions in the secondary television 
school program—appointments effective July 1, 1965* 

There will "be a need for fourteen secondary school subject matter teachers who 
have had successful on-camera teaching experience on the Junior and Senior High School 
level. There will also be need for principals and in-school instructional supervisors. 

In addition to the instructional personnel, there will be a need for additional 
producer-directors, cameramen, engineers, etc. 

Persons interested in becoming a part of this new development in educational 
technology should send a complete personal and professional resume to Mr. Vernon Bronson, 
Director of Research and Development, NAEB, 1346 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington. 


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NAEB COMMENTS ON FCC REGULATION OF CATV SYSTEMS 


The NAEB recently presented its comments to the FCC regarding two dockets now 
before the Commission, Docket No. 14895 and Docket No. 15233> both concerning government 
regulation of CATV systems. 

In brief, the NAEB stated that it concurs with the Commission’s recognition of 
the potential educational value of CATV systems. Further, it shares the Commission’s 
concern that such CATV service develop as a complement to, and not as a substitute for, 
local educational television service. 

The NAEB pointed out that educational broadcasting stations would reach many 
rural areas which were not likely to be included in CATV systems. Therefore, consider- 
ation should be given to having the gro wth and development of — CATV syst e ms com e under 
^continuing regulation by the Commission. 


NAEB OPPOSES DELETION OF VHF RESERVATION IN EVANSVILLE, INDIANA 

The NAEB recently filed with the FCC its opposition to the proposed petition to 
delete reserved Channel 9, Evansville, Indiana, and reassign that channel as a commercial 
assignment at Hatfield, Indiana-Owensboro, Kentucky. 

The Southwestern Indiana Educational Television Council has shown much interest 
in activating Channel 9 in cooperation with the many other educational facilities in the 
tri-state area. The Owensboro on the Air Corp., however, in petitioning for the re¬ 
assignment has recommended closed-circuit as a means of serving the educational needs 
of the Evansville area. 

The petition to delete the Channel 9 reservation has also been officially 
opposed by Gilmore Broadcasting Corporation of Indiana, operators of Evansville UHF 
station WEHT. 














ELECTION CHANGES IN STRUCTURE OF HOUSE AND SENATE COMMERCE COMMITTEES 


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The November 3 Congressional elections saw most incumbents on the 33-man House 
Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce returned to office. Five members of the 
.Committee lost in their bids for re-election; two other members were defeated in the 
primaries. Among the casualties were: Paul F. Schenck (R-Ohio); Milton W. Glenn (R-N.J.); 
Abner W. Sibal (R-Conn.); Donald G. Brotzman (R-Colo.); J. Glenn Beall (R-Md.); J. 

Arthur Younger (R-Calif.); and Kenneth A. Roberts (D-Ala.). Congressman Roberts was 
a key figure on the House side in obtaining enactment of the ETV Facilities legislation. 


THREE APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED FOR FILING UNDER ETV FACILITIES ACT 

Indiana State College, Terre Haute, Indiana, $186,054 in Federal funds to activate 
Channel 27 at Terre Haute. Total project cost is $337,554. 

Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Department of Education, $298,831 to expand facilities 
of Channels 3 and 6 at San Juan and Mayaguez, respectively. Total cost, $398,441. 

Bay Area Educational Television Association, San Francisco, California, $202,260 
to expand Channel 9 a t San Francisco. Total Cost, $269,880. 

A fourth application, already accepted for filing, has been amended: Nebraska 
ETV Commission, Lincoln, Nebraska. Original request for $156,643 has been amended to 
increase the amount to $182,747. Total cost of the project to be increased from 
$313,287 to $365,494. 


HEW GRANTS PROVIDE FUNDS FOR ETV STATIONS 

Six grants recently announced by HEW bring to 45 the number of projects approved 
under the Educational Facilities Act. Total expenditures since funds became available 
is $8,141,062. 

Grant of $186,235 made to the Greater New Orleans ETV Foundation to expand the 
facilities of Channel *8. With the expanded facilities, the station will reach an 
est imat ed 1,126,000 persons and 495 educational institutions. 

Grant of $300,000 to University of Illinois Board of Trustees to improve the 
facilities of Channel *12. The project will quadruple the coverage area and provide 
service for 886,000 of whom 251,500 are students enroled in 774 educational institutions. 

Grant of $250,000 made to ETV Association of Metropolitan Cleveland to activate 
reserved Channel 25, bringing a new ETV service to an estimated 3 million people, 
including 773,000 students at approximately 350 institutions. 

Grant of $96,299 made to University of Idaho to activate and provide a tower, 
antenna, transmitter and other equipment for Channel 12 at the University of Moscow. 

Hie new station, expected to provide service to about 155,000 persons in Idaho and 
Washington, will be the first in a 3-station chain that ultimately will link Moscow, 

Boise, and Pocatello. 

Grant of $298,527 made to Alabama ETV Commission in Huntsville to activate 
Channel *25. This station will extend the Alabama network service to more than 331,000 
persons, including 95,000 students in metropolitan Huntsville and five surrounding counties. 

Grant of $381,707 made to the Board of Education of the City of New York to 
activate and acquire equipment for Channel 25, New York City. Total estimated cost is 
$810,425. Nearly l4 million persons, including over 3 million students in 4,897 educa¬ 
tional institutions are the potential audience of the station. Five boroughs of New 
York, together with the contiguous counties of Nassau, Rockland and Westchester, New York; 
Bergan, Essex and Somerset, New Jersey; and Fairfield, Connecticut, will be reached 
by the new station. 







Scanned from the National Association of Educational Broadcasters Records 
at the Wisconsin Historical Society as part of 
"Unlocking the Airwaves: Revitalizing an Early Public and Educational Radio Collection." 


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